Although no two cases of multiple sclerosis are exactly the same, there are some common symptoms experienced by most people with the disease. The more you know about them, the easier it will be to understand what to expect, whether you are the person with the disorder or you are supporting someone who has been diagnosed.

 

All Symptoms of MS Can Vary

By its nature, multiple sclerosis is a very unpredictable disease. Even if you start to realize there are certain symptoms you're more likely to experience than others, that may not continue to be true over a long-term basis. With that in mind, it's best to try to be as patient as possible when it comes to your symptoms. They can fluctuate over time, but if you keep track of what you're going through and report everything to a doctor, it should be easier to find treatments or symptom management techniques that work.

All Symptoms of MS Can Vary

 

Fatigue Is the Most Common Symptom

By some estimates, about 80 percent of people diagnosed with multiple sclerosis experience extreme fatigue. It usually has a significantly adverse impact on the activity levels they can maintain, whether they are at work, school or home. It's good to keep in mind that if you have been diagnosed with this disease, your life will likely be changed because you won't have the energy levels you once did. This may happen even if you don't have any other major limitations to the things you can do.

 

You May Feel Tingling

People often report a tingling sensation in their faces and limbs when dealing with MS. This is especially likely to happen if they have not been diagnosed yet, or if the diagnosis is very recent, because the tingling is considered an early symptom.

You May Feel Tingling

 

Walking May Become Difficult

As the disease progresses, it may interfere with your ability to walk. However, there are many interventions you can try to preserve the abilities that remain and help you learn to cope with new ways of moving in case the disorder gets worse. Balance issue can sometimes occur, which might be improved through physical therapy and mobility aids.

 

Cognitive Issues Might Be Present

More than half the people diagnosed with multiple sclerosis report cognitive troubles such as difficulties learning new things or processing information. They may also be hindered in terms of the ways they process their environments.

Cognitive Issues Might Be Present

 

A Strong Support System Is Crucial

No matter how long it's been since your diagnosis, you'll find it is a lot easier to handle everything if there are people in your life who are willing to offer mental and emotional support as you go through the changes in your body caused by the disease. Although research is ongoing, there is no cure. However, if you have a good support system, you should feel more uplifted in good times and bad.