Feel like your chest exercises aren't giving you the results you feel you deserve? Well, chances are you're right. Many of us get stuck doing the same exercises over and over again but don't see any change in our bodies. That's because you likely aren't doing the exercises properly or aren't doing enough of them. Look at these top 5 ways to train your chest, from Muscle & Fitness, to help you get on the right track. Put them to memory and get you and your chest straight to the gym.

Tips on Training Chest

 

Timing

Training a muscle two days in a row will force it to grow. The first day focuses on doing high-rep sets that will open up the muscles to allow them to take in more nutrients for the next day's workout, which will be a heavier session. On the first day do single-joint exercises from at least four different angles, such as pullovers, cable crossovers (standing upright and bent-over), incline, flat or decline flyes. Keep the reps high, around 25 to 30. Do about 16 total sets and then consume a lot of protein and carbs. On the second day go heavier, about 6 to 12 reps of flat, incline, decline dumbbell or barbell presses. Do about 16 to 20 sets and then take a week off.

Timing

 

Increase Reps

It's easy to get stuck in a routine of doing the same rep range week after week. Try dropping your weight and using higher reps. Instead of 6 to 10 reps, try 20 reps. This will help build up your endurance. Try doing about 3 to 4 sets with no fewer than 20 reps.

Increase Reps

 

Rest Pause to 40

The benefit of rest-pauses is simple – to perform more work and thus overload the muscles in an attempt to stimulate more growth than could be achieved by straight sets alone. So on either a flat-bench or incline dumbbell press, choose a weight that's about your 5-6 RM (Repetition Maximum). Do two reps at a time, resting 15 to 20 seconds between each pair and do as many as 40 total reps.

Rest Pause to 40

 

Go Down the Rack

Try getting a pair of dumbbells on flat or incline presses that you would normally do for a set of eight reps. Do the set as usual but instead of stopping, immediately go back to the rack, grab a pair of dumbbells that are 20 pounds lighter and rep those. Proceed to go down the rack in 20 pound increments, until you're using 15 to 20 pound dumbbells. Do this two to three times as your last sets for the day. This will shock those stubborn pecs into action.

Go Down the Rack

 

Pre-exhaust the pecs

Pre-exhaustion technique means you do single-joint exercises before compound movements in your workout. This is a great chest training exercise because the triceps usually tire out before the pecs on pressing exercises. When you do your isolation work first your pecs will fatigue first. By hitting the pecs this way you'll be giving your chest muscles a stimulus they're not use to. So when you go to the gym do all your isolation exercises – cable crossovers, flyes and pullovers first and then follow with your pressing exercises – flat, incline, decline dumbbell or barbell presses.

Pre-exhaust the pecs

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